8 Comments
Mar 6Liked by Sam Sager

I feel a rhythm in your words as I read this, tuning me in to my own rhythmicity and sense-making. Thank you for this.

Expand full comment
Mar 6Liked by Sam Sager

Hi Sam I absolutely agree. In fact my work is almost entirely dedicated towards trying to remind us (humans) that we are rhythmic beings. From all the things that I saw you quoting as having a pulse (and it's often the case, so this is in no way a criticism) there is one super important piece that is often left out. The female menstrual cycle is a pulse of life and death continuously, day after day, month after month, for about 40 years of her life. The teaching of rhythm is inbuilt in the female system but modernity has introjected its values in our collective psyches to an extent that many (most!) women forgot that...we weren't initiated in such rhythmic living and men, of course, don't pulse in the same way...so then we are in a double bind because for women to learn to respond to such pulse they can't live under the same constructs that stiffle them in the first place. And since most systems are created without this rhythm/pulse in mind...the cycle of ignorance persists. I wrote about it here: https://www.whatisemerging.com/opinions/menstrual-futurism, and I am actively trying to bring this into culture here: https://theclab.substack.com/. It still still super tricky though...but slowly its getting traction so I appreciated your article and your pointing to the rhythm of life.

Expand full comment
Mar 5Liked by Sam Sager

Thanks Sam. I feel it may be an unfortunate component of modern times. Do you think kids naturally gravitate towards it because they live more in the moment, they are more present? And maybe the reason why a lot of people rediscover this as they get older is when they relearn how to be more mindful. When the pauses in life’s rhythms give us time to stop and be present. Sometime those pauses are thrust on us when we lose loved ones or when we experience health issues. Or sometimes they’re caused by more positive experiences like parenting or new hobbies. As I write this, I realise that they’re not stand-alone pauses they are an innate part of the rhythm. But the new awareness they bring can help bring the present into focus and that’s where the magic is!

Thanks for the link to your other post about Wintering. I look forward to reading it. I just knew that you’d know of Katherine!

Yes, I read Enchantment as soon as it came out. Highly recommend it. And now you’ve mentioned it, I feel that Springtime might be the perfect time for me to revisit it!

Expand full comment
Mar 5Liked by Sam Sager

Hello from England where Spring has sprung too. The birds are getting more vocal at first light and green shoots are unfurling from the ground and the tree branches. I love how you write about embracing the natural rhythms of our lives. As I grow older and seemingly more aware, I notice how these rhythms have a huge impact on how we move in the world. How we participate, how we take action, how we respond or react to external stimuli. Our relationship with the present moment is intimately entwined with these rhythms.

Access to being more present, for me, is linked with awareness of my energy. How am I feeling? Why might I be feeling like that? Physical and mental. Reflecting on how my energy affects my current perception of reality. Small picture, present moment stuff but the big picture is the rhythms you describe and how they affect us. Lots to unpack and think about. Thank you. Thanks for all the links too.

Have you checked out Katherine May’s book “Wintering”? https://katherine-may.co.uk/wintering I think you’ll connect deeply with her writing. It explores a lot of the topics you mention in your article. She’s here on Substack too.

Expand full comment